News

Making the invisible visible: New method opens unexplored realms for liquid biopsies A new approach to RNA sequencing reveals thousands of previously inaccessible RNA fragments in blood plasma that might serve as disease- and organ-specific biomarkers

May 3, 2019

Advancing technology is allowing scientists increasingly to search for tiny signs of cancer and other health issues in samples of patients’ blood and urine. These “liquid biopsies” are less invasive than a traditional biopsy, and can provide information about what’s happening throughout the body instead of just at a single site.

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Crackling and wheezing are more than just a sign of sickness Re-thinking what stethoscopes tell us.

April 17, 2019

Doctors know they’re the sounds of a problem in the lungs, but it turns out they might be more than symptoms—crackling and wheezing could also be the sounds of a disease progressing, according to a University of Michigan researcher.

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Taking shape: New aligned hydrogel tubes guide spinal tissue regeneration New aligned hydrogel tubes guide spinal tissue regeneration

April 8, 2019

Tissue engineering and regenerative medicine hold the promise of new treatment approaches to spinal cord injuries. Since the human body doesn’t naturally regenerate tissues of the spinal cord, new materials and structures that have similar characteristics to native tissue are needed to realize the potential.

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Events

Let's Fix Healthcare: Needs

or: Emphasizing "Life, Liberty, and the pursuit of Happiness"

September 12, 2019 - 11:00 am
Lurie Biomedical Engineering

Bioethics Discussion: Self

September 17, 2019 - 7:00 pm
Lurie Biomedical Engineering

Let's Fix Healthcare: Wants

or: Desiring health/care

September 19, 2019 - 11:00 am
Lurie Biomedical Engineering

Making a Difference

Biomedical Engineering at Michigan: Looking Back

Michigan has been pushing forward the field of biomedical engineering for over 50 years, with incredible technological contributions like ECMO, the silicon neural probe, and the spherocentric knee, to the world-class education of today’s top biomedical engineering minds.

Biomedical Engineering at Michigan: Happening Now

From an engineered scaffold to aid in the early detection of breast cancer metastasis, to a controlled form of ultrasound to non-invasively destroy bad tissue in the body, to a determined mission to enable neural control of prosthetics, Michigan Biomedical Engineering is developing incredible solutions to the worlds most pressing biological and medical challenges.

Biomedical Engineering at Michigan: Moving Forward

Biomedical Engineering at the University of Michigan is poised to make incredible impact in the fields of engineering, biology and medicine in the years and decades ahead, from innovations in undergraduate and graduate education to groundbreaking research.