Neural Engineering

Karen Schroeder, BME PhD Student, demonstrates use of a brain machine interface (BMI) system that uses 100 channel arrays implanted the in motor and premotor cortex with the goal of eventually developing clinically viable systems to enable paralyzed individuals to control prosthetic limbs, as well as their own limbs using functional electrical stimulation and assistive exoskeletons in the NCRC on August 1, 2013.  Photo: Joseph Xu, Michigan Engineering Communications & Marketing www.engin.umich.edu
Karen Schroeder, BME PhD Student, demonstrates use of a brain machine interface (BMI) system that uses 100 channel arrays implanted the in motor and premotor cortex with the goal of eventually developing clinically viable systems to enable paralyzed individuals to control prosthetic limbs, as well as their own limbs using functional electrical stimulation and assistive exoskeletons.

A stimulating history

Michigan has been at the forefront of neurotechnology since the 1970s, when Ken Wise, now a professor emeritus in Electrical Engineering and Computer Science at Michigan, invented the silicon neural probe. Our current cluster of enthusiastic, early-career neural engineering faculty includes affiliates in the Neurology and Neuroscience departments.

 Translational mindset

Unmatched resources

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