News

‘Nightmare bacteria:’ Michigan Engineers discuss how to combat antibiotic resistance Drug-resistant bugs are on the rise and new approaches are needed.

April 20, 2018

Health officials at the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention earlier this month said they are seeing rising cases of “nightmare bacteria” that show strong resistance to antibiotics. More than 200 cases were reported in the last year alone, and across every state in the U.S. “Unusual resistance germs—which are resistant to all or […]

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No sponge left behind: tags for surgical equipment A simple, easy-to-implement technology could prevent the debilitating injuries that can occur when organs are damaged by surgical tools left in the body.

April 15, 2018

Items left behind in patients after surgery can have an enormous personal cost when organs and tissues are damaged. Surgical sponges are among the worst offenders – difficult to see in post-surgical X-rays and yet capable of causing holes when the intestines grow around them, for example. These rare cases, estimated around one in 3,000 […]

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Carlos Aguilar wins highly competitive 2018 3M Non-tenured Faculty Award

April 6, 2018

Assistant Professor Carlos Aguilar has been selected to receive the 2018 3M Non-Tenured Faculty Award from the 3M Corporation. The 3M award recognizes outstanding faculty on the basis of research, experience, teaching and academic leadership. The award was created over twenty-five years ago by 3M’s Technical Community in partnership with the 3Mgives program to invest […]

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A Better Way to Connect Arteries How Coulter’s Newest Licensed Product Is Making Its Way from the Classroom to the Clinic

February 27, 2018

When reconstructive surgeons repair a breast after mastectomy or a severely injured leg after a car accident, they often move tissue harvested from one part of the body to another using microsurgical techniques. A new device developed at U-M and supported by the Coulter Translational Research Partnership Program will make it possible to connect arteries in the transferred tissue to those at the repair site in just minutes with a few easy steps.

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Empowering Neural Engineering

February 16, 2018

Some of the earliest neural engineering work in the field was – pun unintended – conducted at U-M, including the invention of the first silicon neural electrode by Kensall Wise, professor emeritus of BME and Electrical Engineering and Computer Science.

Today a cluster of innovative, accomplished faculty is driving the field forward, working side-by-side with clinicians in the U-M Medical School to focus on translational applications to improve the lives of patients.

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The U-M-Coulter Partnership A pivotal program helps catapult promising biomedical technologies from the lab to the marketplace

January 12, 2018

The 1990s saw the rise of a new term that would reshape biomedical engineering and academic medicine in the years to come — “translational” research.

Driven by funders’ desire to bridge a gap between basic research and clinical application, it encouraged biomedical scientists to more directly impact human health by taking their work “bench to bedside.” In doing so, it suggested that the end-game for academics could just as reasonably be a high-impact journal article as a medical product poised for commercialization.

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Root causes: Bioelectronics to restore organ function

December 15, 2017

The work of Assistant Professor Tim Bruns has been recognized with a highly competitive National Science Foundation Faculty Early Career Development (CAREER) Award. The five-year award will fund Bruns’ winning proposal, “Modeling dorsal root ganglia: Electrophysiology of microelectrode recording and stimulation.”

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New funding for high-fidelity nerve mapping research SPARC awarded $1M to a U-M project developing better nerve mapping

December 1, 2017

The National Institutes of Health’s (NIH) Stimulating Peripheral Activity to Relieve Conditions (SPARC) program awarded a University of Michigan project $1 million in funding to develop “highly-compliant microneedle arrays for peripheral nerve mapping.” NIH’s SPARC program seeks to research and develop how nerves interact with organs in order to develop treatments and therapies for diseases, […]

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Kevlar-based artificial cartilage mimics the magic of the real thing In spite of being 80 percent water, cartilage is tough stuff. Now, a synthetic material can pack even more H2O without compromising on strength

December 1, 2017

The unparalleled liquid strength of cartilage, which is about 80 percent water, withstands some of the toughest forces on our bodies. Synthetic materials couldn’t match it – until the “Kevlartilage” developed by researchers at the University of Michigan and Jiangnan University. “We know that we consist mostly of water – all life does – and […]

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Closest look yet at killer T-cell activity could yield new approach to tackling antibiotic resistance An in-depth look at the work of T-cells, the body's bacteria killers, could provide a roadmap to effective drug treatments.

October 27, 2017

In a study that could provide a roadmap for combatting the rising threat of drug-resistant pathogens, researchers have discovered the specific mechanism the body’s T-Cells use to kill bacteria.

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Identifying New Targets in Cancer Metabolism and Treatment

October 16, 2017

Progress in cancer research over the past ten years has helped scientists gain a greater understanding of cancer cell metabolism and how cancer cells interact…

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Bionic heart tissue: U-Michigan part of $20M center Scar tissue left over from heart attacks creates dead zones that don’t beat. Bioengineered patches could fix that.

October 10, 2017

The University of Michigan is partnering on an ambitious $20 million project to grow new heart tissue for cardiac patients.

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Reading cancer’s chemical clues A nanoparticle-assisted optical imaging technique could one day read the chemical makeup of a tumor.

September 18, 2017

A tumor’s chemical makeup holds valuable clues about how to fight it. But today, it’s difficult or impossible to examine the chemistry inside a tumor.

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$7.75M for mapping circuits in the brain A new NSF Tech Hub will put tools to rapidly advance our understanding of the brain into the hands of neuroscientists.

August 7, 2017

The technology exists to stimulate and map circuits in the brain, but neuroscientists have yet to tap this potential.

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Lab-grown lung tissue could lead to new cancer, asthma treatments A look at how Michigan Engineers created a biomaterial scaffold to help researchers from the U-M Medical School grow mature human lung tissue.

July 31, 2017

In a breakthrough that could one day lead to new treatments for lung diseases like asthma and lung cancer, researchers have successfully coaxed stem cells—the body’s master cells—to grow into three-dimensional lung tissue.

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Mildred F. Denecke Scholarship Fund endowed The fund will provide need-based support for students in the Department of Biomedical Engineering (BME).

July 28, 2017

Mildred F. Denecke (BSE Phys ’49) recently made a gift to endow the Mildred F. Denecke Scholarship Fund. The fund will provide need-based support for students in the Department of Biomedical Engineering (BME).

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Bright ideas Master's student research explores concept generation in design

June 29, 2017

Generating ideas during an engineering design process is crucial to developing successful solutions. But teaching – and learning – about idea generation in design is challenging for instructors and students alike.

Anastasia Ostrowski (BSE BME ’16, MSE BME ’17), has been conducting research with the aim of providing insights to improve idea generation, and therefore design education, for BME students.

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M-HEAL + Mentors = Design Progress

June 6, 2017

The student-run organization M-HEAL, Michigan Health Engineered for All Lives, has a laudable, and ambitious, mission: to design healthcare solutions in collaboration with international partners to positively impact global health.

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Improving medical devices Collaboration by design

May 31, 2017

A new experiential learning opportunity at U-M, the Medical Device Sandbox (MDS), helps both BME students and health care learners, including medical students, residents, nurses, and other health providers, collaborate across disciplines to improve device design and, ultimately, patient safety

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Understanding pediatric pulmonary hypertension Creating new imaging and modeling tools to improve diagnosis and management

May 31, 2017

Pulmonary hypertension (PH), a lung disorder that causes high blood pressure in the pulmonary arteries, affects an estimated 15 million to 50 million individuals worldwide. Its progressive nature, impact on quality of life, and life-threatening long-term consequences make it an important focus of basic scientific and translational research.

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Undergrad Caroline Woody named a contributing author of Science article Advancing the understanding of HIV treatment

May 31, 2017

It’s not every day that a first-year undergraduate is named a contributing author on a research article, particularly high-impact work published in the prestigious journal Science. Caroline Woody, now a sophomore, has earned that distinction.

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‘Sister cell’ profiling aims to shut down cancer metastasis Michigan engineers release individual cells from a specially-designed chip using laser pulses.

May 19, 2017

In work that could improve understanding of how cancer spreads, a team of engineers and medical researchers at the University of Michigan developed a new kind of microfluidic chip that can capture rare, aggressive cancer cells, grow them on the chip and release single cells on demand.

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Keeping drugs on the job

May 4, 2017

Computer simulations developed at the University of Michigan reveal how well drug additives stop the active ingredients from crystallizing in the digestive tract. They tested these simulations on the anti-seizure drug phenytoin.

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Collaboration between Project MESA and Washtenaw Community College’s Advanced Fabrication Program

April 14, 2017

M-HEAL’s Project MESA has been finalizing its design of a portable gynecological examination table for use in rural mobile clinics in Nicaragua. In addition to improving the design’s comfort, durability, and clinical features, they have been working to simplify manufacturing of their product. The group connected with Amanda Scheffler, a welding instructor at Washtenaw Community College (WCC).

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Four BME students receive NSF Graduate Research Fellowships

April 3, 2017

U-M Biomedical Engineering had four National Science Foundation (NSF) Graduate Research Fellowship award winners in 2017.

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U-M Schools and Colleges Form Regenerative Medicine Collaborative

March 31, 2017

ANN ARBOR, MI –A Regenerative Medicine Collaborative, formed with support from U-M Office of Research, College of Engineering, and School of Medicine, aims to foster connections and enable new initiatives among investigators at the major U-M schools and colleges, including: U-M Engineering, Medical School, Dentistry, LSA, Public Health, and Pharmacy.

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U-M leads major new regenerative medicine center funded by NIH

March 8, 2017

ANN ARBOR—A new interdisciplinary health sciences resource center at the University of Michigan has received an $11.7 million award from the National Institutes of Health to advance regenerative medicine.

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Coating method could improve temporary implants that dissolve in the body

March 3, 2017

A strategy for coating complicated surfaces with biodegradable polymers has been pioneered by a team of researchers led by Joerg Lahann, a professor of chemical engineering and director of the Biointerfaces Institute at U-M. It could enable coatings for implants that dissolve in the body, such as drugs to improve healing.

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Tim Bruns wins NSF CAREER Award

March 1, 2017

U-M BME assistant professor Tim Bruns has received a prestigious National Science Foundation Faculty Early Career Development (CAREER) Award.

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3-D printed orthotics and prosthetics: A better fit, the same day

February 28, 2017

A new way to design and 3D print custom prosthetics and orthotics could give amputees, stroke patients and individuals with cerebral palsy lighter, better-fitting assistive devices in a fraction of the time it takes to get them today.

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