Making a Difference

Biomedical Engineering at Michigan: Looking Back

Michigan has been pushing forward the field of biomedical engineering for over 50 years, with incredible technological contributions like ECMO, the silicon neural probe, and the spherocentric knee, to the world-class education of today’s top biomedical engineering minds.

Biomedical Engineering at Michigan: Happening Now

From an engineered scaffold to aid in the early detection of breast cancer metastasis, to a controlled form of ultrasound to non-invasively destroy bad tissue in the body, to a determined mission to enable neural control of prosthetics, Michigan Biomedical Engineering is developing incredible solutions to the worlds most pressing biological and medical challenges.

Biomedical Engineering at Michigan: Moving Forward

Biomedical Engineering at the University of Michigan is poised to make incredible impact in the fields of engineering, biology and medicine in the years and decades ahead, from innovations in undergraduate and graduate education to groundbreaking research.

News

Empowering Neural Engineering

Some of the earliest neural engineering work in the field was – pun unintended – conducted at U-M, including the invention of the first silicon neural electrode by Kensall Wise, professor emeritus of BME and Electrical Engineering and Computer Science.

Today a cluster of innovative, accomplished faculty is driving the field forward, working side-by-side with clinicians in the U-M Medical School to focus on translational applications to improve the lives of patients.

Read more »

The U-M-Coulter Partnership A pivotal program helps catapult promising biomedical technologies from the lab to the marketplace

The 1990s saw the rise of a new term that would reshape biomedical engineering and academic medicine in the years to come — “translational” research.

Driven by funders’ desire to bridge a gap between basic research and clinical application, it encouraged biomedical scientists to more directly impact human health by taking their work “bench to bedside.” In doing so, it suggested that the end-game for academics could just as reasonably be a high-impact journal article as a medical product poised for commercialization.

Read more »

Root causes: Bioelectronics to restore organ function

The work of Assistant Professor Tim Bruns has been recognized with a highly competitive National Science Foundation Faculty Early Career Development (CAREER) Award. The five-year award will fund Bruns’ winning proposal, “Modeling dorsal root ganglia: Electrophysiology of microelectrode recording and stimulation.”

Read more »