Kristy Brock, Ph.D.

Associate Professor, Radiation Oncology
Associate Professor, Biomedical Engineering

(734) 936-4294
B2C432 UH
1500 East Medical Center Drive
Ann Arbor, MI 48109-0010

Research Interests 1. Biomechanical Model-Based Deformable Registration: In 2003, I developed a research program focused on the development of a novel deformable modeling technique using biomechanical models and finite element analysis, Morfeus. The technique, which is substantially different than the widely available deformable image registration algorithms that rely on image intensity, incorporates the biomechanical properties of tissues to model the complex interaction of neighboring tissues and tumors. The application has been tested and validated on a number of anatomical sites including head and neck, lung, breast, esophagus, liver, pancreas, stomach, cervix, prostate, and rectum. This has expanded to include modeling of tissue response to radiation, applications in small animals, and generation of 3D or 4D models from limited data. 2. Dose Reconstruction: The development of Morfeus, the biomechanical model-based deformable registration algorithm, has enabled investigations into the reconstruction of a more accurate calculation of the dose delivered to the tumor and surrounding normal tissue over the course of treatment. With the use of accurate deformable registration, the impact of breathing motion, tissue deformation, and tissue volume changes on the delivered dose has been investigated retrospectively to enable intelligent design of prospective clinical trials to adapt to these changes. 3. Correlative Pathology: The use of deformable registration to integrate multi-modality images has raised the question of which imaging modality, or combination correctly identifies the tumor boundary? I have developed a research program in correlative pathology (deformable registration between histology and in vivo images) to investigate this issue. To understand the changes in the material properties during fixation, I have also begun to research the application of magnetic resonance elastography (MRE). The MRE research has also enabled an additional research focus on small animal imaging and intervention to evaluate radiation and drug response, which will improve our understanding of these complex changes for applications in human clinical studies.