Advising

Undergraduate and Combined BSE/MSE (SUGS)

Contact

Susan Graeber, Academic Advisor/Counselor,
Undergraduate Studies and SUGS Program
2200 Bonisteel Blvd.
1111 Carl A. Gerstacker
Phone: (734) 763-5290
Fax: (734) 936-1905
Email: sbitzer@umich.edu

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Graduate programs

Graduate advisors by concentration

Bioelectrical

Bioelectricity is the study of electrical fields and potentials within the body. In the bioelectrical concentration students learn how to examine and control these fields towards developing medical devices and restorative therapies. The core classes within this concentration focus on 1) examining nerve and cardiac bioelectrical fields from a computational standpoint and 2) understanding techniques to model neurons and to stimulate and record from individual and large populations of neurons. Electives within this concentration include courses on medical imaging, systems-level neuroscience, and introductions to microelectronics and signal processing. Students graduating from BME with a bioelectrical concentration will be able to work as engineers in the rapidly expanding fields of neural engineering, medical diagnostics, and medical systems industries, or pursue advanced degrees in medicine, basic medical sciences, or bioelectrical engineering.

Timothy Bruns, Ph.D.
Assistant Professor, Biomedical Engineering
B10-A169 NCRC
2800 Plymouth
Ann Arbor, MI 48109-2800
Phone: (734) 647-8727
Email: bruns@umich.edu
Research Areas: Neural Engineering.

Biomaterials

Biomaterials is the study of interactions between living and non-living materials. Students trained in biomaterials must have a thorough understanding of the materials they work with and properties of the biological system they seek to replace. Biomaterials are also an integral component in tissue engineering and regenerative medicine.  Biomaterials research areas include: design of orthopaedic, dental, cardiovascular and neuro-sensory prostheses, artificial organs, blood-surface interactions, cellular and tissue engineering, drug delivery, biosensors, microencapsulation technology, and implant retrieval analysis. Students graduating from BME with a concentration in biomaterials will be capable of working in the medical device industry, academic or government laboratories, or pursuing further education in Ph.D. or professional programs.

David Kohn, Ph.D.
Professor, Biomedical Engineering
Lurie Biomedical Engineering Building, Room 2130
1101 Beal Avenue
Ann Arbor, MI 48109-2110
Phone: (734) 764-2206
Fax: (734) 647-2110
Email: dhkohn@umich.edu
Research Areas: Biomaterials, Biomechanics, Tissue Engineering and Regenerative Medicine.

Biomechanics

Biomechanics is a hybrid discipline requiring a thorough understanding of classic engineering mechanics, physiology and cell biology, and the interface between the two. Biomechanics also has important applications in cutting-edge fields like tissue engineering and mechanotransduction. In tissue engineering, one tries to regenerate new tissues to replace defects in existing tissue. This requires knowledge of tissue-mechanical function. Mechanotransduction is the study of how cells sense and react to mechanical stimulus, a field with applications in such diverse areas as hearing (haircell movement in fluids) and orthopaedics (bone and tendon response to physical stress). Graduates in this concentration will be prepared for a wide range of industries concerned with mechanical affects on the human body including surgical device industries, automotive safety, and biotech industries concerned with mechanically functional tissue. Students will also have excellent preparation to attend medical school or pursue a Ph.D.

David Kohn, Ph.D.
Professor, Biomedical Engineering
Lurie Biomedical Engineering Building, Room 2130
1101 Beal Avenue
Ann Arbor, MI 48109-2110
Phone: (734) 764-2206
Fax: (734) 647-2110
Email: dhkohn@umich.edu
Research Areas: Biomaterials, Biomechanics, Tissue Engineering and Regenerative Medicine.

Biomedical Imaging

Since the invention of x-ray computerized tomography more than 25 years ago, imaging has become the primary noninvasive diagnostic tool available to the clinician. Although many principles are common to all imaging modalities, biomedical imaging scientists and engineers must understand the basic physics and operating principles of all primary modalities including magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), radiography and nuclear medicine, optics, and ultrasound. Major biomedical imaging companies require such multi-modality expertise to design new devices and procedures. In addition, clinical problems increasingly require the techniques of cell and molecular biology to design both new contrast agents and imaging methods for a wider range of applications. The biomedical imaging curriculum recognizes trends and requires students to have a solid background in signal processing and imaging science, and simultaneously be literate in both the basic life sciences and the basic operating principles of several imaging modalities. Graduates of this program will be well prepared to work in the medical imaging industry, to attend medical school, or to study for a Ph.D. in BME.

Xueding Wang, Ph.D.
Associate Professor, Biomedical Engineering
Associate Professor, Radiology
2125 Carl A. Gerstacker Building
2200 Bonisteel Boulevard
Ann Arbor, MI 48109-2099
Phone: (734) 647-2728
Email: xdwang@umich.edu
Web: Optical Imaging Lab
Research Areas: , , ,.

Biotechnology

Advances in cellular and molecular biology have changed and expanded the ways therapeutic devices and drugs are designed. Modern biotechnology depends on scientists and engineers who study the fundamental properties of cell, molecular, and tissue biology, and apply these to engineer materials and technology to interact with living systems. Goals include production of improved biomaterials for medical implants and prosthetics, tissues engineered for specific functionality, and new therapeutic drugs. The biotechnology curriculum emphasizes critical areas of chemistry,molecular biology, and cell biology, but also exposes students to a broad range of engineering approaches necessary for this interdisciplinary field. Graduates of this program will be well prepared for jobs in the pharmaceutical or medical device industries, to attend professional schools, or to study for a Ph.D.

Jan Stegemann, Ph.D.
Professor, Biomedical Engineering
Lurie Biomedical Engineering Building, Room 2146
1101 Beal Avenue
Ann Arbor, MI 48109-2099
Phone: (734) 764 8313
Email: jpsteg@umich.edu
Web: http://cmite.bme.umich.edu
Research Areas: Bio-Nanotechnology, Biomaterials, Organ and Whole Body Biomechanics, Tissue Engineering and Regenerative Medicine.

Medical Product Development

The design and development of medical devices and systems is unique in the way they are regulated and structured. Biomedical engineers can play key roles at all stages of medical product development, from needs finding and concept generation to design, prototyping, testing, fabrication, and commercialization. The goal of this concentration is to provide students with the practical knowledge and skills needed to bring new and improved devices to the clinic, in the context of the current healthcare environment. The core course is a two-semester design-build-test experience in which student teams work to solve real clinical problems in collaboration with practicing physicians. This experience is augmented with elective courses in regulatory affairs, quality systems, intellectual property, innovation, and other topics relevant to the development and commercialization of medical products. Graduates of this program will be well prepared for jobs in product development in a variety of medically-oriented industries, including biotechnology, pharmaceuticals, and medical devices.

Jan Stegemann, Ph.D.
Professor, Biomedical Engineering
Lurie Biomedical Engineering Building, Room 2146
1101 Beal Avenue
Ann Arbor, MI 48109-2099
Phone: (734) 764 8313
Email: jpsteg@umich.edu
Web: http://cmite.bme.umich.edu
Research Areas: Bio-Nanotechnology, Biomaterials, Organ and Whole Body Biomechanics, Tissue Engineering and Regenerative Medicine.